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Venue

Ama Tibetan Restaurant
阿妈藏餐
10am – 9pm
27 Ximian Qiao Heng St., Wuhouci neighborhood,
武侯祠洗面桥横街27号
028 88836788
028 85597158
Tibet is a place that inspires many image: it’s distinctive version of Buddhism and their vivid prayer flags and monk robes, the equally distinct wildlife, not to mention its breathtaking scenery. Such things quickly leap to mind. Rarely, however, does its food. Ama Tibetan Restaurant, near Wuhou temple, however, provides the perfect opportunity to give Tibetan cuisine an open-minded exploration in a relaxed and elegant setting.

Upon entering the restaurant, those who’ve traveled west to Tibet will immediately recognize Ama’s roomy, high-beamed architecture. Small prayer wheels spin at the counter, framed robes and daily articles such as antelope leather pouches hang from the walls and impressive gold-leafed etchings illuminate the ceiling. Tibetan music videos play at a peaceful volume, while the waitresses, wearing full-length traditional dresses, are extremely friendly and welcoming.

The large, Tibetan-and-Chinese menu features a surprisingly extensive range of dishes, all featuring full-color pictures. Yes, there is plenty of yak, but even more beef. We thought we’d be clever and order the deep fried mutton ribs (zha yang pai, 30RMB), which were fatty and greasy enough to evoke open-fire meals overlooking desolate vistas. Other dishes, including a light beef and celery (15RMB), and an oil-drenched cabbage and mushroom (12RMB), while authentically Tibetan, possess familiar Chinese characteristics.

And while Ama doesn’t exactly break the widely-held belief that Tibetan cuisine and vegetarianism are essentially incongruous, there are a slim number of dishes freed from the beef/yak tyranny. The vegetable soup (8-25RMB), a mildly threatening, dark slime green in color, was salty and bitter, but in a surprisingly agreeable manner, while the veggie momos (dumplings 0.8RMB/piece) were serviceable, if unremarkable. Make sure their culinary staple, tsampa (zangba, 4-6RMB), is eaten in tandem with butter tea as to remedy its inherent tastelessness. And while traditionalists hold that such tea should be drunk with salt, our pot was served with milk and sugar. Expect to pay 40-50RMB/person for a full meal.



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Mark Hiew (more chengdu)
Tibet is a place that inspires many image: it’s distinctive version of Buddhism and their vivid prayer flags and monk robes, the equally distinct wildlife, not to mention its breathtaking scenery. Such things quickly leap to mind. Rarely, however, does its food. Ama Tibetan Restaurant, near Wuhou temple, however, provides the perfect opportunity to give Tibetan cuisine an open-minded exploration in a relaxed and elegant setting.

Upon entering the restaurant, those who’ve traveled west to Tibet will immediately recognize Ama’s roomy, high-beamed architecture. Small prayer wheels spin at the counter, framed robes and daily articles such as antelope leather pouches hang from the walls and impressive gold-leafed etchings illuminate the ceiling. Tibetan music videos play at a peaceful volume, while the waitresses, wearing full-length traditional dresses, are extremely friendly and welcoming.

The large, Tibetan-and-Chinese menu features a surprisingly extensive range of dishes, all featuring full-color pictures. Yes, there is plenty of yak, but even more beef. We thought we’d be clever and order the deep fried mutton ribs (zha yang pai, 30RMB), which were fatty and greasy enough to evoke open-fire meals overlooking desolate vistas. Other dishes, including a light beef and celery (15RMB), and an oil-drenched cabbage and mushroom (12RMB), while authentically Tibetan, possess familiar Chinese characteristics.

And while Ama doesn’t exactly break the widely-held belief that Tibetan cuisine and vegetarianism are essentially incongruous, there are a slim number of dishes freed from the beef/yak tyranny. The vegetable soup (8-25RMB), a mildly threatening, dark slime green in color, was salty and bitter, but in a surprisingly agreeable manner, while the veggie momos (dumplings 0.8RMB/piece) were serviceable, if unremarkable. Make sure their culinary staple, tsampa (zangba, 4-6RMB), is eaten in tandem with butter tea as to remedy its inherent tastelessness. And while traditionalists hold that such tea should be drunk with salt, our pot was served with milk and sugar. Expect to pay 40-50RMB/person for a full meal.


Ama Tibetan Restaurant
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