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Venue

Jin Guan Tang
世纪锦官堂
11am-9:30pm
253-3, Wuhouci St.
武侯祠大街253附3号
028 8509 3948
“This place is a bank, not a restaurant,” remarked a dining companion, noting the crowd in the room. There were large groups at nearly every table, which were close set enough to make us feel like we were at a community dinner. The simple tableware, furniture and lighting provided a relaxing setting for the crowd, which reflects the mix of Tibetan and Chinese in the neighbourhood. The hardworking servers were patient and efficient and had a good understanding of the menu, which is well-illustrated and has a good selection of traditional Sichuan dishes with a new twist or two.

The server recommended a dish called home-style fish (风味家乡鱼), and a cold-seasoned eggplant dish (蘸水茄子). We asked what kinds of greens were available and the server listed off water spinach, bitter melon, and a few others. When asked how we want our greens cooked we usually ask for “qing chao” which is lightly stir-fried with little seasoning, or “suan chao,” stir-fried with garlic, but this time we opted for water spinach, stir-fried in “qiang chao” style with red pepper and Sichuan pepper. They came out very nicely done. We also ordered a rather inventive but very locally-flavoured dish of kidney beans stir-fried with chillies, potatoes, and preserved pork belly which showed off the kitchen’s wok skills. (Is it just us, or are kidney beans (yao dou) turning up in more and more local restaurants lately?) Another dish we saw on nearly every table was the twice cooked pork, so we made a note to try it next visit. Their spicy water-boiled fish (shui zhu yu), is well-reported on. They had beer, peanut milk, and juice on the beverage menu but we were more than happy with the gratis tea.

This street has several large and elaborate restaurants with menus to match, so this little restaurant with basic, well-prepared food and the crowd providing most of the atmosphere is a breath of fresh air. We often are asked where to eat when bringing visitors to Wuhou Temple, Jinli, or the Tibetan part of town. Jin Guan Tang fits the bill nicely and diners can expect to drop around RMB50 per head.
Comments  (Add Comment)
Susan Johnson (more chengdu)
“This place is a bank, not a restaurant,” remarked a dining companion, noting the crowd in the room. There were large groups at nearly every table, which were close set enough to make us feel like we were at a community dinner. The simple tableware, furniture and lighting provided a relaxing setting for the crowd, which reflects the mix of Tibetan and Chinese in the neighbourhood. The hardworking servers were patient and efficient and had a good understanding of the menu, which is well-illustrated and has a good selection of traditional Sichuan dishes with a new twist or two.

The server recommended a dish called home-style fish (风味家乡鱼), and a cold-seasoned eggplant dish (蘸水茄子). We asked what kinds of greens were available and the server listed off water spinach, bitter melon, and a few others. When asked how we want our greens cooked we usually ask for “qing chao” which is lightly stir-fried with little seasoning, or “suan chao,” stir-fried with garlic, but this time we opted for water spinach, stir-fried in “qiang chao” style with red pepper and Sichuan pepper. They came out very nicely done. We also ordered a rather inventive but very locally-flavoured dish of kidney beans stir-fried with chillies, potatoes, and preserved pork belly which showed off the kitchen’s wok skills. (Is it just us, or are kidney beans (yao dou) turning up in more and more local restaurants lately?) Another dish we saw on nearly every table was the twice cooked pork, so we made a note to try it next visit. Their spicy water-boiled fish (shui zhu yu), is well-reported on. They had beer, peanut milk, and juice on the beverage menu but we were more than happy with the gratis tea.

This street has several large and elaborate restaurants with menus to match, so this little restaurant with basic, well-prepared food and the crowd providing most of the atmosphere is a breath of fresh air. We often are asked where to eat when bringing visitors to Wuhou Temple, Jinli, or the Tibetan part of town. Jin Guan Tang fits the bill nicely and diners can expect to drop around RMB50 per head.

Jin Guan Tang
Jin Guan Tang Jin Guan Tang
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